Religion and the search for new ideals in the USSR
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Religion and the search for new ideals in the USSR

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Published by Published for the Institute for the Study of the USSR [by] Praeger in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Soviet Union

Subjects:

  • Soviet Union -- Religion,
  • Soviet Union -- Social life and customs

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by William C. Fletcher and Anthony J. Strover.
SeriesPraeger publications in Russian history and world communism,, no. 187
ContributionsFletcher, William C., ed., Strover, Anthony J., ed., Institut zur Erforschung der UdSSR.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBR932 .R38
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 135 p.
Number of Pages135
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5539280M
LC Control Number67016683
OCLC/WorldCa382740

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John Anderson explores the shaping of Soviet religious policy from the death of Stalin until the collapse of communism, and considers the problems in this area facing the newly-independent states of the former Soviet Union. The book will be of interest to students and scholars of Soviet and post-Soviet studies, religious history, and the politics of church-state by:   Marx said religion was the opium of the people – and in the Soviet Union, atheism became government policy, enforced by the state and encouraged by . This book does not deal with theology. It is an attempt to provide a fuller understanding of Russian reality by drawing attention to what might be called 'the other Russia', the Russia of the believers. I did not begin writing this book with any preconceived ideas about the strength of religion in the Soviet Union. Religious Minorities in the Soviet Union (Report / Minority Rights Group) Paperback – December 1, by Michael Bourdeaus (Author)Author: Michael Bourdeaus.

This book is the third in a projected series of ten volumes produced by the Russian Littoral Project, sponsored jointly by the University of Maryland at College Park and the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University. Atheists waged a year war on religious belief in the Soviet Union. The Communist Party destroyed churches, mosques, and temples; it executed religious leaders; it flooded the schools and media with anti-religious propaganda; and it introduced a belief system called “scientific atheism,” complete with atheist rituals, proselytizers, and a promise of worldly salvation. Church-state relations have undergone a number of changes during the seven decades of the existence of the Soviet Union. In the s the state was politically and financially weak and its edicts often ignored, but the s saw the beginning of an era of systematic anti-religious persecution. There was some relaxation in the last decade of Stalin's rule, but under Khrushchev the pressure on. The First Socialist Society is the compelling and often tragic history of what Soviet citizens lived through from to , told with great sympathy and perception. Tracing the evolution of the Soviet political system from its origins in , Geoffrey Hosking shows how power has rarely been transmitted outside a tightly knit ruling elite and explains the forms of contact that have existed Cited by:

The Communist Party of the Soviet Union arose from the Bolshevik wing of the Russian Social Democratic Workers’ Party (RSDWP). The Bolsheviks, organized in , were led by Vladimir I. Lenin, and they argued for a tightly disciplined organization of professional revolutionaries who were governed by democratic centralism and were dedicated to achieving the dictatorship of the proletariat. Making use of newly-available archival material, this book provides the first systematic and accessible overview of church-state relations in the Soviet Union. John Anderson explores the shaping of Soviet religious policy from the death of Stalin until the collapse of communism, and considers the problems in this area facing the newly-independent states of the former Soviet Union. Throughout the history of the Soviet Union, there were periods when Soviet authorities brutally suppressed and persecuted various forms of Christianity to different extents depending on State interests. Soviet Marxist-Leninist policy consistently advocated for the control, suppression, and ultimately, the elimination of religious beliefs, and it actively encouraged the propagation of Marxist-Leninist atheism in the Soviet Union. However, most religions .   Books were strictly censored by the state and Stalin ordered the writing of a new book called “A short history of the USSR” which had to be used in schools. Outside of school, children were expected to join youth organisations such as the Octobrists for 8 to 10 year olds and the Pioneers for the 10 to 16 year olds.